Want to know why God doesn’t wear a watch?

Want to know why God doesn’t wear a watch?  Probably because it would drive him to the same distraction it drives us!  Ever find yourself racing across a parking lot or down a hallway or into a building or up a sidewalk . . . and constantly cocking your arm to check your watch?  Someone once asked Mark Buchanan what his biggest regret in life was.  He replied, “Being in a hurry.  Getting to the next thing without fully entering the thing in front of me.  I cannot think of a single advantage I’ve ever gained from being in a hurry.  But a thousand broken and missed things, tens of thousands, lie in the wake of all that rushing.”  (Spirit of Revival vol 39 no 1 p 10)  Who has time to rest when we’re in such an insane hurry?
According to the January 2008 Reader’s Digest the average American worker receives 108 emails every day.  243 million Americans own cell phones or handheld wireless devices.  Google currently indexes 3,307,998,701 web pages.  We now get more information in 72 hours than our parents likely received in a month. (Ibid p 25)  Who has time to rest!
“Be still and know that I am God” (Psalm 46:10).  But how can I be still when my Timex ticks so loudly?  Perhaps Calvin Miller is right, “Time itself must be surrendered to the pursuit of the depths of God.  All watches must be checked at the gates of the throne room.” (Ibid)
Isn’t that the secret to the Sabbath as well?  Checking my watch at the gates of his throne room?  “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest” (Matthew 11:28).  But if my Blackberry’s beeping, my Timex is ticking, my laptop is flickering and my iPod is playing . . . how can I possibly check all my stresses at the gate of his Sabbath?
So here’s an idea.  What if for the Sabbath we kept time the way God did “in the beginning?”  Checking our watches at the gate, we enter his time, twenty-four hours of rest, bookended only by two glorious sunsets.  No watches . . . one friendship . . . two sunsets . . . and the three words of our very best Friend:  “Come to me.”  Can you imagine a rest more satisfying?

Comments

What a concept! I wonder, however, how people would get to Sabbath School and Church on time without their watches. So few are able to do so even with their watches and other time keeping devices. I attend a church where the average church membership is about 80, average attendance is about 35, and at the beginning of Sabbath School, there might be about 8 people in attendance. As the morning program progresses the people dribble in until those who are going to be there are present by 10:30.

How very true! It is hard to "be still" in our society, but it is so refreshing to rest in God. I wish I would lay my burdens down at God's feet more often; that is my prayer.

Pastor Dwight, Thank you. Is it American to hurry or is the whole world part of this craze with time? Sabbath was a joy growing up as an Aseno. Daddy at the piano, all cooking done, all clothes pressed, we sung as a family for the joy of Sabbath till midnight sometimes. Now, I find myself in a hurry in America whereas I seemed to have time for God at all times in Africa. At the University of Eastern Africa-Baraton in Kenya, Friday meant the whole world to me as they locked down the library, my backpack 10 feet away from me in my dorm room. As a shy young woman, loving my God took place of shyness as I sung my heart out, preached at the pulpit,went foe outreach, became the first student deaconess, taught the Sabbath school lesson e.t.c- I had all the time to serve my God. As a mother now, a wife, and a professional registered nurse at Womavk Army Medical Center, there are weekends I have to rotate and work. Instead of sitting at the fire place and teaching my children about God and our dearest friend Jesus, sometimes I'm in the hospital bathing a sick man. Yes, I can go to the linen room to kneel down and pray before they call a code but that is not enough. I just want all of my Friday sundown to Sabbath sunset intact. What solution is there?

Time: a concept of man and a result of sin. Our lives are measure by time from the time we are born until the day we die. But in heaven, time is a strange concept. Sometimes my watch will be a bother, so I will remove my watch and place it in my pocket or I will use a pocket watch. Try it sometime and you will notice that time is less a concern. Sometimes when I take my walks, I will do that and my walks will last 2 or 3 hours. Time should be a concept, not a ball and chain.

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